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How total media ad spend is shaking out around the world

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  • The following is a preview of recent Insider Intelligence data.

Total media ad spending worldwide will decline by 4.5% this year to reach $614.03 billion. While this is slightly up from our June 2020 forecast of -4.9% growth, it’s a sharp contrast to our pre-pandemic estimate of 7.0%.

eMarketer top 10 countries ranked by total media ad spending growth 2020 change 259743

Most ad markets we track will post negative growth in total media ad spending.

eMarketer


We expect total media ad spending worldwide to rebound to pre-pandemic levels next year and hit $691.50 billion. Driving this rebound will be strong growth in digital ad spending globally, at 16.4% in 2021, more than double the 7.9% growth that traditional media spending will see next year.

All 37 ad markets we track—with the exception of China—will post negative growth

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BBC journalists told not to ‘virtue signal’ in social media crackdown

BBC journalists have been told to avoid any online “virtual signalling” that could indicate a personal political view, as part of a crackdown on their social media accounts.



a man wearing a suit and tie: Photograph: Andrew Milligan/PA


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Andrew Milligan/PA

The rules announced on Thursday explicitly state that all BBC employees’ social media accounts – even if labelled as a personal account – should be considered to be subject to public scrutiny.

Staff working in the BBC’s news division have been told to avoid expressing a view on any policy that is a matter of current political debate, or publicly supporting campaigns “no matter how apparently worthy the cause or how much their message appears to be accepted or uncontroversial”.

The term “virtue signalling” was first defined in an article in the Spectator magazine in 2015 to criticise people who say or write things to make clear they are “admirably non-racist, left-wing or open-minded”

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BBC journalists told not to ‘virtue signal’ in social media crackdown | BBC

BBC journalists have been told to avoid any online “virtual signalling” that could indicate a personal political view, as part of a crackdown on their social media accounts.

The rules announced on Thursday explicitly state that all BBC employees’ social media accounts – even if labelled as a personal account – should be considered to be subject to public scrutiny.

Staff working in the BBC’s news division have been told to avoid expressing a view on any policy that is a matter of current political debate, or publicly supporting campaigns “no matter how apparently worthy the cause or how much their message appears to be accepted or uncontroversial”.

The term “virtue signalling” was first defined in an article in the Spectator magazine in 2015 to criticise people who say or write things to make clear they are “admirably non-racist, left-wing or open-minded” without actually doing anything to change the world.

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The social media hearing was a missed opportunity for lawmakers

with Tonya Riley

Lawmakers uncovered little new information that could actually inform their efforts to regulate the tech industry during yesterday’s hearing with three influential social media CEOs.

Instead, they appeared more focused on scoring political points six days before the presidential election than on holding the companies to account, even though they have serious concerns about the industry’s behavior. Republicans primarily used their time to attack Twitter’s Jack Dorsey, Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg and Google’s Sundar Pichai for perceived bias against conservatives. Meanwhile, Democrats were more focused on criticizing their Republican colleagues, accusing them of trying to bully the chief executives by holding a hearing in the final stretch before Election Day. Some did not ask questions at all. 



a man wearing a suit and tie: Jack Dorsey, chief executive officer of Twitter Inc., listens via videoconference during a Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee hearing in Washington.Photographer: Michael Reynolds/EPA/Bloomberg


© Michael Reynolds/Bloomberg
Jack Dorsey, chief executive officer of Twitter Inc., listens via videoconference during a Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee hearing in Washington.Photographer: Michael Reynolds/EPA/Bloomberg

Lawmakers essentially treated the

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Election Tests Companies’ Policies on Social Media, Political Speech

The political rancor of the upcoming U.S. presidential election is putting pressure on companies and their compliance officers to engage proactively with employees on ethical behavior and social-media use.

Corporate codes of conduct and social media policies are hardly a cure-all for the challenges posed by the increasing polarization of political views among Americans, but with companies increasingly sensitive to reputational risks, experts say it would behoove corporate leaders to remind employees of their existence before an issue arises.

Clifford Rossi, an expert on risk management and a professor at the Robert H. Smith School of Business at the University of Maryland, said the consequences for not doing so are increasingly severe.

“Awareness and sensitivity is really what this is about, Mr. Rossi said. “That’s how you manage this risk: Make

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New ‘Media Manipulation Casebook’ from Harvard teaches how to detect misinformation campaigns

This is the latest installment in the 2020-2021 school year of a weekly feature on this blog — lessons from the nonprofit News Literacy Project, which aims to teach students how to distinguish between what is real and what is not in an age of digital communication in which the president routinely denounces real news as “fake.”



background pattern: The Twitter logo is displayed on a mobile phone. (Photo illustration by Olivier Douliery/AFP/Getty Images)


© Olivier Douliery/AFP/Getty Images
The Twitter logo is displayed on a mobile phone. (Photo illustration by Olivier Douliery/AFP/Getty Images)

The material comes from the project’s newsletter, the Sift, which takes the most recent viral rumors, conspiracy theories, hoaxes and journalistic ethics issues and turns them into timely lessons with discussion prompts and links. The Sift, which is published weekly during the school year, has more than 10,000 subscribers, most of them educators.

The News Literacy Project also offers a program called Checkology, a browser-based platform designed for students in grades six through

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Republicans Blast Social Media C.E.O.s While Democrats Deride Hearing

WASHINGTON — Lawmakers hammered the chief executives of Twitter, Facebook, Google and one another at a Senate hearing on Wednesday, with Republicans claiming the companies were suppressing conservative views while Democrats accused their colleagues of holding a “sham” hearing for political gain.

For nearly four hours, members of the Commerce Committee pelted Twitter’s Jack Dorsey, Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg and Google’s Sundar Pichai with more than 120 questions about social media speech and the harm caused by their platforms, often framing their attacks through the lens of next week’s election.

But unlike previous tech hearings, this one put the partisan divide on full display. Republicans attacked Twitter and Facebook for what they said was censorship of posts by conservative politicians and for downplaying a recent New York Post article about Hunter Biden, the son of the Democratic presidential nominee, Joseph R. Biden Jr.

“Mr. Dorsey, who the hell elected you and

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Girl Scouts deletes social media congratulations to Amy Coney Barrett on Supreme Court seat after angry backlash

  • The Girls Scouts of America sparked a wave of angry comments — and praise — with Facebook and Twitter posts congratulating the conservative judge Amy Coney Barrett for her controversial appointment to the Supreme Court.
  • “Congratulations Amy Coney Barrett on becoming the 5th woman appointed to the Supreme Court since its inception in 1789,” the post said.
  • The Girl Scouts later deleted the posts.
  • President Donald Trump nominated Barrett to the high court shortly after the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.
  • Democrats are outraged that the Senate quickly confirmed Barrett, whom they see as a threat to Obamacare, abortion rights and LGBT rights.



Tanishq Mathew Abraham et al. posing for a photo


© Provided by CNBC


And that’s the way the cookie crumbles.

The Girls Scouts of America on Wednesday night deleted social media posts congratulating conservative judge Amy Coney Barrett for her controversial appointment to the Supreme Court hours after the posts sparked a wave of

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Facebook, Google and Twitter CEOs face Senate hearing

Days before an election marked by fears of civil war and stolen victory, the Senate heard testimony Wednesday morning on a rare subject where there exists something resembling bipartisan agreement: the need to rethink the law shielding internet platforms from liability for the content they host.

Three of the biggest names in digital media — Alphabet Chief Executive Sundar Pichai, Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg and Twitter Chief Executive Jack Dorsey — spoke before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation about Section 230 of the 1996 Telecommunications Act.

Section 230 established that websites and service providers are not legally responsible for what their users post while leaving the door open for them to moderate user content, as long as they do so “in good faith.” It’s this question of moderation that’s prompted some of the most aggressive attacks on the law, which President Trump has moved to

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US election 2020: Trump hits campaign trail blaming media and tech

Copyright: Getty Images

The US has faced a reckoning over race relations in recent months, and now protests in Philadelphia over the police shooting of a black man have again thrown the issue into the spotlight.

Walter Wallace, 27, was fatally shot by police on Monday – his family say he was experiencing a mental health crisis at the time. Police say he refused to drop a knife he was holding. Hundreds of protesters have marched through the city for two nights. Officials say 30 police officers were injured on Monday night.

“We cannot accept that in this country a mental health crisis ends in death,” Democratic candidates Joe Biden and Kamala Harris said on Tuesday.

“It makes the shock and grief and violence of yesterday’s shooting that much more painful, especially for a community that has already endured so much trauma.” They also condemned looting that took

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