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Singapore Media Festival Finds Opportunities in Pandemic Crisis

Storytellers from Asia have demonstrated resilience and creativity amid the disruptions brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic. From Nov. 26 to Dec. 6, they are gathering — physically or virtually — at one of the largest annual media events in the region, the Singapore Media Festival.  

It’s a muchneeded opportunity that bridges those storytellers with global markets in challenging times.  

The SMF returns for a seventh edition in 2020 with an array of events to showcase and connect filmmakers and content creators from around the region. The fest rides on the citystate’s unique status as a media-tech hub in Asia, and prepares talent to reimagine Asian storytelling and embrace the future in the post-pandemic era. 

“As we recover from this challenging climate, we have to ensure that there continues to be opportunities for the region’s talents

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Buskers look back on a pandemic summer

Street performers are a common sight in New York City. Passersby can regularly catch a jazz performance on a Harlem street corner, a spoken word poet in the subway or, as was the case on a warm Saturday afternoon last month, a punk rock concert in the East Village’s Tompkins Square Park.



a young boy sitting on a bench: The Pinc Louds are comprised of Claudi Love, center, a singer and guitarist, alongside Raimundo Atal, left, on keyboard and Mark Mosterin, right on bass guitar. Jamie Emerson, bottom, a visual artist, performs alongside dressed as a rat.


© ABC News
The Pinc Louds are comprised of Claudi Love, center, a singer and guitarist, alongside Raimundo Atal, left, on keyboard and Mark Mosterin, right on bass guitar. Jamie Emerson, bottom, a visual artist, performs alongside dressed as a rat.

Claudi Love is a singer, guitarist and kalimba player, alongside Raimundo Atal on keyboard and Mark Mosterin on bass guitar. Together they’re Pinc Louds, a punk rock band known for New York City-themed songs like “Traffic Lights,” “Magical Garbage” and “Sardines In A Can.”

Pinc Louds are buskers — another word for street performers — and can

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Louis Tomlinson’s second album plans thrown off by Covid-19 pandemic

WENN/Instar

Louis Tomlinson was ready to start work on his second solo album when the COVID-19 pandemic hit.

The 28-year-old former One Direction star tells Britain’s The Telegraph newspaper that some of the tracks on his debut record, Walls, were “truer to (him) than others” and, on its follow-up, he wants to ensure he’s “owned” everything he’s trying to say.

“I’m very, very excited. I had basically penciled down a plan before corona took over our lives,” explains the singer. “And now it’s kind of given me a little bit of time to really get into what I want to say and what I want things to sound like. Because, you know, I was really proud of my first record, but there were moments that I felt were truer to me than others.

“I think that there were some songs where I took slightly more risk and owned what

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Philadelphia Arts Organizations Struggle to Stay Afloat Amidst the Pandemic

Many performing arts organizations across the Philadelphia area have been struggling since the start of the pandemic. ABC 6 talked with some about what that has been like, and impact it has had.

“We have furloughed, we have had a round of layoffs, we have a hiring freeze from the beginning at the office,” said Karen Corbin, chief operating officer of the Philadelphia Pops.

The Philadelphia Orchestra is also struggling, but are doing their best to ensure their survival in the future.

“The musicians and the staff made big sacrifices to their pay in order to make sure the orchestra can thrive on the other side of this,” said Matias Tamopolsky, CEO of the Philadelphia Orchestra.

Arts and culture brought in $4.1 billion annually to the Greater Philadelphia region, and provided 55,000 full time jobs prior to the pandemic. Since March, the industry has lost nearly $131 million.

Not just

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Your favorite fall TV shows look normal. Making them in a pandemic is anything but.

On ABC’s “Black-ish,” lead doctor character Rainbow encounters scary realities at the hospital. On NBC’s “This Is Us” the Pearson family contends with the many effects of quarantine. And in the CBS hit “Bull,” the title character, a jury expert, endures the hallucinations of a disorienting disease that appears to be covid-19.



Sara Gilbert, Lecy Goranson, John Goodman sitting at a table: Laurie Metcalf, Sara Gilbert, Alicia Goranson and John Goodman in “The Conners.” The comedy has been among a number of prime-time shows to shoot and return to the air during the pandemic. (Eric McCandless/ABC)


Laurie Metcalf, Sara Gilbert, Alicia Goranson and John Goodman in “The Conners.” The comedy has been among a number of prime-time shows to shoot and return to the air during the pandemic. (Eric McCandless/ABC)

To watch scripted television in recent weeks is to believe Hollywood has steamrolled through the coronavirus pandemic. Fall shows, it would seem, are chronicling the grim interruptions to Americans’ lives without suffering any of their own.

But the up-to-the-minute plotlines gild what insiders say has been a very tumultuous time. Covid-19 and its restrictions have been taking a heavy toll on scripted television, forcing

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Shaggy planned to record with Sting before pandemic struck

Shaggy was set to record a second album with Sting before the pandemic ruined their plans.



a person standing on a stage: Shaggy


© Bang Showbiz
Shaggy

The 52-year-old star – who released ’44/876′ with Sting in 2018 – has revealed that his new record, ‘Christmas In The Islands’, was originally supposed to be a joint effort with his showbiz pal.

He told The Sun newspaper’s Bizarre column: “This started as an idea with Sting and I. We thought, ‘Wouldn’t it be cool to do a Christmas carols album in reggae?’

“I started working on some of the tracks in March and then the pandemic happened.

“But I thought, ‘Oh that’ll be over in two months and then I’ll link up with Sting and he’ll bring all the sauce’. Then it kept going and he is stuck in England, so the album ended up being a Shaggy Christmas.”

Sting, 69, previously admitted that their musical partnership came

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Grammy Immersive Audio Award Postponed Due to COVID-19 Pandemic

In a rare occurrence, there was one category actually missing from the 63rd Grammy Awards when the nominations were announced on Tuesday morning: Best Immersive Audio Album.

In a statement, the Recording Academy explained that the committee that judges the award, which essentially recognizes superior sound quality, was unable to meet together in a suitable and safe environment with the appropriate high-end audio equipment.

“Due to complications caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, the nominations for the 63rd Grammys for Best Immersive Audio Album will be announced next year in addition to (and separately from) the 64th Grammy nominations in the category,” the statement reads. “The judging of the entries in this category has been postponed until such time that we are able to meet in a way that is appropriate to judge the many formats and configurations of the entries and is safe for the committee members.”

Formerly known as

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How The Pandemic is Transforming Theater

A series of immersive audioplays performed and mixed live, using tech developed by theatrical sound designers and engineers. A summer festival’s entire season of new plays and classics released on Audible. A wild satire of gay identity politics, beamed to your computer in a high-gloss, multicamera broadcast from a theater space in Brooklyn. A playwright’s recreation of “The Seagull” in “The Sims 4,” livestreamed on Twitch.

This is theater in 2020, as the pandemic has prodded an ancient art form — and an often hidebound industry — to explore the digital potential it’s eyed so warily in the past. As the theater’s biggest commercial motor, Broadway, has languished, resourceful artists and producers are making work that incorporates video, gaming and interactivity into hybridized digital-theater forms that, rather than serving as mere stopgaps, stand poised to endure even after the return of theater as we knew it.

“There are so many

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How ‘Blue Bloods’ and Other Shows Resumed Filming in Pandemic N.Y.C.

“Just the Covid division alone for each production could be up to 40 people,” said Doug Steiner, the chief executive of Steiner Studios, where seven series, including Amazon’s “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” and Showtime’s “City on a Hill,” are back in business.

About one person every week or two test positive somewhere on the lot, Mr. Steiner said. But so far, he said, the productions have managed to isolate cases and their contacts, and continue filming. Studios pay for testing, and their coronavirus teams do their own contact tracing.

The city said that at least one production had shut down for two weeks because of virus cases, while others have shut down for a day or two.

It’s impossible to get a complete picture of how often the coronavirus is appearing on set, as no one is tracking that number fully. Daniel Hank, a New York producer and a member

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Pandemic Disrupts South Korean Adoptee Reunions, but Some Find a Way

The twins’ mother is now 85 on a farm in rural South Korea, afflicted with dementia and Parkinson’s disease.

“When I heard that, I was very worried,” Ms. Doerr said. They became more worried when their June trip had to be postponed. Her condition is still mild, they believe, but the fear is “less and less of her memory will be available as she gets older.”

Their biological brother, who speaks some English, told the twins that their father wanted sons rather than daughters.

“Coming to terms with all that,” Ms. Doerr said, “has been an interesting ride for me.”

Undeterred by the prospect of two weeks in a hotel, Allison Young, 38, traveled in August from her home in Frederick County, Md., to South Korea with her husband and three biological children. She was returning as both an adoptee and

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