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HBO’s ‘Between the World and Me’ is a powerful, pandemic-influenced, theatrical TV special

Disney+ proved there was a real audience for filmed versions of Broadway shows when it shifted “Hamilton” to streaming and wound up with one of the biggest hits of the summer. In the wake of its success, other streamers are rushing to follow suit. Most shows that are already open are unfortunately not in a position to step back onto the stage for filming — many union contracts for live theater are expressly written with the idea that this is art that will not be a repeatable experience. Newer shows, on the other hand, are eager to promote their work ahead of what they hope will, one day, be a grand reopening. Netflix has commissioned the new musical “Diana” to film a staged version for streaming in 2021. HBO brought “American Utopia” straight from Broadway via Spike Lee.

“Between the World & Me,” is something altogether different, both old and

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Kanye West’s ‘Lost In The World’ Came From A Poem For Kim Kardashian

Kanye West is celebrating the My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy on Sunday and as a result, fans took to Twitter to celebrate the album and post their best memories of it like when they first bought the album or seeing the GOOD Music rapper perform live. Others used the anniversary to debate whether or not the 2010 album was the best release in Kanye’s catalog.

Others like Kim Kardashian, however, had a much more personal connection to the album. The wife of Kanye West revealed a very interesting tidbit about “Lost In The World” from My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy.

Sharing the news on her Instagram story, Kim said, “For those that don’t know the story of ‘Lost In The World’ on My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy…. Kanye couldn’t come up with some lyrics and then realized he had them, it was what he wrote me for my 30th

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When It Was the Beatles’ World and We Just Lived in It

The story of the Beatles did not end happily. Break-ups are seldom cheerful. But it was not, as some of us thought at the time, the end of the damn world.

Craig Brown tells that story in 150 Glimpses of the Beatles, from the early days to 1970, when the four members of the band went their separate ways. But what Brown does best is remind us why the split did seem at the time—to Beatles fans at least—like the end of everything.

I don’t know if Brown’s is one of the best books written about the band because I’ve never managed to finish a book about them, but it’s one of the best books I’ve read on any subject in a good while.

With a handful of exceptions (the autobiographies of Keith Richards and Count Basie, Nick Tosches’ book about Jerry Lee Lewis), I’ve never been too

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Jan Morris, a Distinctive Guide Who Took Readers Around the World

Morris found early success as a journalist, scooping the world on Edmund Hillary’s and Tenzing Norgay’s ascent of Everest while nearly climbing the entire mountain herself. She was a distinctive, elegant, formidable and wickedly snobby historian and travel writer and occasional novelist.

She wrote a fair amount of doddle later in her life; not all of her stuff is worth the investment. (If you can make it through her books on Lincoln and Canada, you are a hardier person than I am.) But “Venice,” “Oxford,” “Spain,” “The Matter of Wales,” “Manhattan ’45” and “Hong Kong,” to name a few, are her true gravestones. Even in her lesser work, you always feel a real intellect weighing and discarding ideas and objects; she made unexpected links between things. When she was good, she was very good indeed.

Her most approachable book — Jan Morris for beginners — is “Pleasures of a Tangled

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Thousands Attend Pakistani Cleric’s Funeral Despite COVID-19 Curbs | World News

LAHORE, Pakistan (Reuters) – Tens of thousands of mourners attended the funeral of a hardline Pakistani cleric in the eastern city of Lahore on Saturday, defying a government ban on large public gatherings in the wake of rising COVID-19 cases in the country.

Khadim Hussain Rizvi, 54, died of cardiac arrest on Thursday, just days after leading a violent protest march to the capital, Islamabad, against the publication in France of cartoons depicting the Prophet Muhammad.

Daily coronavirus infections have risen in Pakistan this month, and the government banned big events and meetings as it declared the country was witnessing a “second wave” after a three-month lull in cases.

Official data released on Saturday showed 2,843 people had tested positive for the virus and 42 had died during the last 24 hours – both figures the highest for a day since July.

Despite the coronavirus curbs, tens of thousands turned

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Philippines’ Duterte Ends Overseas Travel Ban on Healthcare Workers, Minister Says | World News

MANILA (Reuters) – Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte has approved ending a ban on deploying the nation’s healthcare workers, his labour minister said on Saturday, clearing the way for thousands of nurses to take up jobs overseas.

“The president already approved the lifting of the temporary suspension of deployment of nurses and other medical workers,” Labour Secretary Silvestre Bello told Reuters.

Bello said the spread of the novel coronavirus was slowing down in the country and conditions were improving, so the government could afford to let its healthcare workers leave.

The Philippines has the second-highest number of COVID-19 cases and deaths in Southeast Asia, but daily case numbers and death rates have dropped.

To ensure the Philippines has enough medical professionals to continue to fight the pandemic at home, only 5,000 healthcare workers will be allowed to leave every year, Bello said.

“We are starting only with a cap of 5,000

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What’s on TV Saturday, Sunday Talk ‘Between the World and Me’

During the coronavirus crisis, the Los Angeles Times is making some temporary changes to our print sections. The prime-time TV grid is on hiatus in print but an expanded version is available in your daily Times eNewspaper. You can find a printable PDF online at: latimes.com/whats-on-tv.

SERIES

California Cooking With Jessica Holmes Goldbelly founder Joe Ariel discusses the holiday dinners, desserts and treats they can send to your home for Thanksgiving in this new episode. 7:30 p.m. The CW

Earth’s Great Seasons “Autumn (Extended)” (N) 8 p.m. BBC America

The Great Food Truck Race Five aspiring food truck teams kick off the holidays in snowy Wolfeboro, N.H., in the three-episode season premiere of the unscripted competition. Tyler Florence hosts. 8, 9 and 10 p.m. Food Network

History’s Greatest Mysteries The new episode “Titanic’s Lost Evidence” examines a box that was left unopened in a British manor house for 108 years

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Bay Street Theater to Stream World Premiere of A CHRISTMAS CAROL with Jefferson Mays

Bay Street Theater to Stream World Premiere of A CHRISTMAS CAROL with Jefferson Mays

Bay Street Theater & Sag Harbor Center for the Arts have announced+ the world premiere of the 2018 Geffen Playhouse production of A Christmas Carol on Saturday, November 28, at 9 p.m. EST via On The Stage streaming services. Tickets will be made available on baystreet.org and are $50 per household, which includes unlimited viewing for 24 hours.

The work is one-man adaptation by Jefferson Mays, Susan Lyons, and Michael Arden, based on the famed Charles Dickens novel. The production was conceived by Michael Arden and Dane Laffrey. For more information, contact marketing coordinator, Michael Pintauro, at [email protected]

This is A Christmas Carol unlike any other-past, present or future. The timeless tale of Ebenezer Scrooge comes to thrilling new life as Tony Award-winner Jefferson Mays (I Am My Own Wife, Gentleman’s Guide…) plays over 50 roles in a virtuosic, master class of a performance that one must see to believe.

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Escape to the Gucci-Filled World Created by Gus Van Sant and Alessandro Michele

This time of year, as awards season heats up and movie premieres happen almost daily, Hollywood and the fashion industry can usually be found joining forces on the red carpet. This extraordinary year, however, it’s happening—like everything else — online. This week Oscar-nominated director Gus van Sant and Gucci creative director Alessandro Michele debuted Overture For Something That Never Ends, a seven-part miniseries co-directed by the pair. Premiering at their digital festival GucciFest, the series showcases Gucci’s new collection titled Ouverture, which features several re-edition pieces from Michele’s first women’s collection for Gucci (Fall Winter 2015). All pieces will feature red labels stitched with “Something That Never Ended.”

The series, shot in Rome in October (abiding by all COVID guidelines), follows Silvia Calderoni—a well-known Italian dancer, actor, and DJ—as she embarks on her daily tasks.

The first four episodes feature Silvia immersed into the colorful, pattern filled world

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Hulu’s ‘Animaniacs’ Reboot Runs in Circles Trying Old Tricks in a New World: TV Review

Click here to read the full article.

The new “Animaniacs,” premiering on Hulu 27 years after it first debuted and in a world where the iconic WB water tower recently got an HBO Max makeover, is well aware of what its preemptive critics might think of it. In one of the first new episodes, for instance, Warner brothers Yakko (Rob Paulsen), Wakko (Jess Harnell) and their Warner sister Dot (Tress MacNeille) sing a peppy song about Hollywood’s conveyer belt of reboots that ends with them all sitting on a giant pile of cash while the Hulu logo blares behind them in bright neon. In the tweaked opening credits, one of TV’s most enduring theme songs gets pointed lyric updates advising mad nerds to remember that the “Animaniacs” “did meta first,” and assuring the audience that this reboot is appropriately “gender neutral” and “ethnically diverse” for its new era. (Sure.) So

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